Cats.

Cats are friendly and sociable pets who will show you plenty of love.

People often say that cats have servants and dogs have masters! Whilst its true that cats will show you affection on their own terms, they do make great companions. We’ve put together a few health tips when it comes to caring for your cats.

Vaccinations

Vaccinations can take much of the worry out of cat ownership because you’ll know that your feline friends are protected from a range of diseases, including those that can prove fatal. It’s highly recommended that your cat receives its vaccinations and regular boosters. Kittens can be vaccinated once they are 8-9 weeks old.

Neutering male cats

Castration removes the testicles. This means they cannot cause pregnancy, thereby removing the risk of an unwanted mating and the associated costs of this. Castration also removes the risk of testicular cancer and reduces the risk of prostate disease and other cancers.
Neutered cats are generally less likely to roam as far away from home, so minimises the dangers that they may get into when out. If done young, from 4 months old, it may reduce aggressive behaviour so they will be at less risk of injury and illness from fighting. It also stops them spraying in the house.

Spaying female cats

Spaying removes the uterus and ovaries from the female. This means that she cannot come into season or get pregnant. Due to the removal of organs and hormonal influence, it removes the risk of womb infections and disease, and reduces the likelihood of her developing mammary cancer. Also, unwanted pregnancy can become expensive and time consuming.

Microchipping

Whilst it’s not a legal requirement to have you cat microchipped (it is for dogs) it’s certainly a good idea. Cats do have a tendency to roam far and wide and can go missing as a result. Having a microchip with up to date ownership details can help missing cats be reunited with their owners.

A microchip is inserted under the cat’s skin and is designed to last for the cat’s lifetime. The microchip number is unique to your cat and can be read by a scanner kept by all vets’ practices should your cat ever go missing and be taken to the nearest vets.